Workshops and Short Courses

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Magnus Wiklund, Tzung-Yin Lee
Qualcomm, Skyworks
Location
109B
Abstract

Both, CMOS FinFET and FD-SOI are the enabling technology that allows nanoscale CMOS beyond 20nm. This technological revolution does not only allow highest integration density for high volume products at low cost. Due to the fundamental change how a transistor is built, there is impact on its characteristics as e.g., Ft, Vt, VDD. Considering this change, traditional and well-known circuits and architectures need to adapted or even be invented. This workshop gives an overview of novel architectures and designs in the context of RF and millimeter wave that benefit from FinFET and FD-SOI technologies. In several presentations trends, design challenges, and how these are overcome supported by application/circuit examples are shown. Furthermore, commoditization of 4G and emerging 5G cellular systems have continued to push application of advanced Si/SiGe and SOI technology for integration, performance, and cost. This workshop discuss the challenges and trade-offs of various Si-based technologies for 5G cellular application, their respective modeling, automated design and layout perspectives for successful productization.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WSA-1: The Paradigm Shift of RF and millimeter Wave Circuit Design with FinFET Technology: How to Keep Up with The Next Generation of CMOS Process Technology for Circuit Optimization and Planning
Hyung-Jin Lee, Intel Corp.
Abstract
WSA-2: Integration of a Wideband Direct-RF Radio in 16nm FinFET
Brendan Farley, Xilinx Ireland
Abstract
WSA-3: Compiling Analog-to-Digital Converters in FDSOI
Trond Ytterdal, Norwegian Institute of Technology
Abstract
WSA-4: Millimeter-Wave Circuit Design and Techniques in FDSOI CMOS Technology
Abdellatif Bellaouar, GLOBALFOUNDRIES
Edoardo Charbon, Ranjit Gharpurey
EPFL, Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Delft, Intel, The University of Texas at Austin
Location
104AB
Abstract

Quantum computers (QCs) hold the promise to change computing as we know it today. What is generally not discussed is the importance of classical electronics to support a QC's computational core: the qubit. In this workshop, we look at the requirements of electronic circuits and systems supporting qubits, with a special interest in scalability issues and silicon (CMOS, SiGe, ...) compatibility of quantum-classical computing systems. World experts in the field will present their work and their vision for a possibly integrated QC of the future, often reflecting on architectural and design issues, with a keen interest in the design of high-speed and RF circuits and systems sought by QC architects. Finally, we will look at other applications that could benefit from qubits and, in general, quantum technologies, from the perspective of classical readout and control CMOS circuits and systems operating at cryogenic temperatures (Cryo-CMOS). We will conclude with a general vision of the field and its trends as well as perspectives for the future.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WSB-1: Should RFIC Designers Care About Quantum Computing?
Stefano Pellerano, Intel
Abstract
WSB-2: Fabrication and Integration of Superconducting Qubits and Circuits
William D. Oliver, MIT Lincoln Laboratory, MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics, MIT Department of Physics
Abstract
WSB-3: Superconducting Classical Circuits for Quantum Computing Readout and Control
Oleg Mukhanov, HYPRES, Inc.
Abstract
WSB-4: Silicon Germanium Cryogenic Low Noise Amplifiers for Quantum Computing
Joseph C. Bardin, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Abstract
WSB-5: Cryo-CMOS Circuits and Systems for Scalable Quantum Computing
Fabio Sebastiano, Andrei Vladimirescu, Edoardo Charbon
Masoud Babaie, Delft Univ. of Technology

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Patrick Reynaert, Leon van den Oever, Ping Gui
KU Leuven, Qualcomm, SMU university
Location
103ABC
Abstract

Fifth Generation (5G) systems are expected to represent a major revolution in mobile wireless technologies. The focus of this workshop is on 5G systems that will operate at mm-wave frequencies (28-80GHz) and may employ massive MIMO, in order to achieve enhanced data rates, higher spectral efficiency, extended battery life, and low system latency.
Aspects that will be addressed are: system architecture, power-amplifier (PA) design, circuit techniques, technology choices, front-end and antenna interfaces, user equipment/basestation. Moreover, This workshop brings together the advocates and experts of both bulk, SOI and SiGe, as well as GaN and other technologies, to explain in which cases their preferred technology is the right choice.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WSC-1: Millimeter wave beamforming: System level challenges and implications for RF design
Vasanthan Raghavan, Qualcomm
Abstract
WSC-2: Design considerations for 5G mm-wave transceivers
Stefan Andersson, Ericsson Research, Lund, Sweden
Abstract
WSC-3: Power Amplifier Requirements for mm-Wave 5G Systems
Bror Peterson, Qorvo
Abstract
WSC-4: Broadband, Linear, and High-Efficiency Mm-Wave Power Amplifiers and Co-Designs with Antennas
Hua Wang, Georgia Tech
Abstract
WSC-5: Reconfigurable wideband architectures and antenna co-design and co-integration for future MIMO arrays
Kaushik Sengupta, Princeton Univ.
Abstract
WSC-6: Hybrid Beamforming Receivers for Millimeter-wave MIMO Communication
Jeyanandh Paramesh, Carnegie Mellon Univ.
Abstract
WSC-7: 5G Infrastructure Radio Design Measurements and Standards Aspects
Raja Mir, Nokia
Abstract
WSC-8: Enabling Cost-Effective 5G Phased Array mmWave Products by Optimizing the flow from Design-for-Test to Production
Mustapha Slamani, Global Foundries
Francois Rivet, Gernot Hueber
Univ. Bordeaux, France, NXP Semiconductors, Austria
Location
106AB
Abstract

With the advent of nano-scale CMOS technology, exciting new developments have recently taken place in the field of RF and mm-wave transmitters, receivers and frequency synthesizers.
The low-voltage, fast speed, fine feature-size and low cost of the new technology have forever changed the way we design circuits, architectures and systems. Not only the RF/mm-wave circuits have taken different shapes from what has been taught in textbooks but also their integration with digital processors have enabled new possibilities for digital assistance.
The motivation of this workshop is to capture what is the state at the edge of technology, what is the demand of the industry in the context of high volume products, as well, what are circuit and architectural concepts that are demanded or enforced by the technology.
We focus especially on circuit enabling extreme bandwidth using various techniques including MIMO, analog/digital signal processing, novel high-rate ADCs, techniques for channel bonding, carrier aggregation to reach data rates far beyond what it is achievable nowadays.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WSD-1: Millimeter-wave CMOS Transceiver Toward 1 Tbps Wireless Communication
Kenichi Okada, Tokyo Institute of Technology
Abstract
WSD-2: Wideband Transceiver Design for 5G mmWave Phased-Arrays in FinFET Technology
Steven Callender, Intel Labs
Abstract
WSD-3: 300-GHz CMOS wireless transceiver and its future
Minoru Fujishima, Hiroshima University
Abstract
WSD-4: Multi-GHz frequency synthesis for radar applications
Bodhisatwa Sadhu, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center
Abstract
WSD-5: Linear mmWave Power Amplifiers and transceivers for 5G NR mmwave
Jeremy Dunworth, Qualcomm
Abstract
WSD-6: Hybrid Architectures Leveraging Best of Both Worlds for eXtreme-Bandwidth Communications
Payam Heydari, University of California Irvine
Abstract
WSD-7: Wideband mm-wave Communication Systems: A Systematic Design Approach
Gabriel M. Rebeiz
Hasan Al-Rubaye, University of California San Diego
Vito Giannini, Hongtao Xu
Uhnder Inc., Fudan Univ.
Location
102AB
Abstract

Recent advances in millimeter-wave and THz silicon technology have drawn strong interest in the RF community. Mm-wave sensors and THz imagers are becoming essential building blocks in several application domains: for example, in the automotive industry, mm-wave radars are considered a key component for safety critical applications and autonomous driving cars. In the industrial world, drones and robotics will rely on such sensors to avoid obstacles or complete complex tasks. In the medical and pharmaceutical industry, THz prototypes find application in home patient monitoring, high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy. This workshop aims at covering the state of the art and the future development trends including FMCW and MIMO radars, as well as THz imagers. This includes silicon and systems operating at carriers beyond 30 GHz. Distinguished speakers from industry and academia will highlight system requirements, technology advances, challenges and solutions for implementations on system and silicon level.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WSE-1: Autonomous Vehicles Systems and the Future of Riding
Sergio Pacheco, NXP
Abstract
WSE-2: MIMO Radars and beamforming with multichip cascading
Sreekiran Samara, Texas Instruments
Abstract
WSE-3: MIMO radar system integration
Chris Pan, Uhnder Inc.
Abstract
WSE-4: New SiGe technologies with cut off frequencies towards 600 GHz and their potential impact on future mmW sensing in automotive and industrial applications
Wolfgang Liebl, Infineon
Abstract
WSE-5: Mm-wave for cm accurate ranging: Signals, building blocks and a little bit of algorithms
Wim Dehaene, KU Leuven
Abstract
WSE-6: Millimeter waves for cars, people, cells, and molecules
Ilja Ocket, imec and KU Leuven
Abstract
WSE-7: Hyperimager: A compact multi-spectral imaging platform
Alberto Valdes-Garcia, IBM Research
Abstract
WSE-8: Large-Scale THz Active Arrays in Silicon for Bio-Chemical Sensing
Ruonan Han, MIT
Abstract
WSE-9: Silicon based multispectral terahertz imaging
Richard Al Hadi, UCLA
Abstract
WSE-10: An Integrated-Circuit Approach to Terahertz Nearfield Imaging
Ullrich Pfeiffer, University of Wuppertal
Mohyee Mikhemar, Harish Krishnaswamy
Broadcom Limited, Columbia Univ.
Location
111B
Abstract

The complexity of the conventional RF front-end SAW/BAW filtering and switching is the biggest hurdle in the pursuit of a true wideband software-defined radio for high performance wireless applications. It is also a challenge for many IoT systems with application-specific size or cost restrictions. Therefore, there have been serious efforts from the RFIC community to come up with RF filtering techniques, that are suitable for CMOS integration.
After more than a decade of promising research results, some of these techniques are starting to be used in mass market products.
In this workshop, experts from academic, industry, and federal research institutions will present the state-of-the art in the area of CMOS-integrated RF filtering such as N-path filters, electrical balance duplexers, and various linear periodic time varying (LPTV) systems that has been used, for example, to implement a fully-integrated non-magnetic CMOS circulator.
Moreover, the commercial state-of-the art performance of SAW/BAW technology and tunable RF components will be presented as a point of reference. Finally, the workshop will conclude with an interactive panel discussion about the potential and limitations of CMOS integrated RF filtering.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WSF-1: Workshop Introduction: Integrated Antenna-Interface Components: A Blessing in Disguise for Wireless Transceivers
Harish Krishnaswamy, Columbia Univ.
Abstract
WSF-2: Pushing the Interference Robustness of CMOS N-Path Filters
Eric Klumperink, Twente University in Enschede, The Netherlands
Abstract
WSF-3: Demystifying the analysis of LPTV circuits using Adjoint Networks
Shanthi Pavan, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras
Abstract
WSF-4: Solutions for Reconfigurable Mobile Device RF Front-ends
Arthur Morris, WiSpry, Inc
Abstract
WSF-5: Electrical-Balance Techniques for Tunable, Fully Integrated RF Front-Ends
Barend van Liempd, IMEC
Abstract
WSF-6: Integrated Self-Interference Cancellation for Next-Generation Wireless Communication Systems
Jin Zhou, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Abstract
WSF-7: Rethinking the RF Front-End: Integrated Magnetic-Free Non-Reciprocity and Its Application in Emerging Wireless Communication Paradigms
Negar Reiskarimian, Columbia Univ.
Abstract
WSF-8: Using Sampling Aliases For Sharp Programmable Filtering: Some Radio Applications
Sudhakar Pamarti, UCLA
Jaber Khoja, Ed Balboni
Rockwell Collins, Analog Devices
Location
109A
Abstract

This workshop will focus on wireless systems demanding high performance local oscillators and clock generators. This includes cellular infrastructure, wireless backhauling, mm-wave radar and imaging, data converters for communication systems. In all these applications, it would be desirable to implement the whole system in the same silicon technology process, while achieving low integrated phase noise (<1deg) and noise floor at mm-wave, low reference and integer boundary spurs (<90dBc). State-of-the-art RF to THz synthesizer architectures and building block details will be covered, including phase-locked loops, frequency doubler/tripler, injection locked divider, lock distribution etc. Advanced PLL architectures such as inductor-less PLLs, SSPLL, ILPLL will also be discussed. In addition, this workshop will discuss the fundamentals of digital PLLs as well as the latest advancements in the field. Digital PLLs have great scalability and easy portability to new CMOS process nodes, and have today a wide range of application from wireless to wireline systems, not limited to the GHz frequency range but spanning up to the millimeter-wave range. The workshop will introduce the main concepts to analyze and design digital PLLs, taking into account system design constraints, quantization noise and design of the mixed-blocks such as the DCO and the TDC. State-of-the-art techniques will be discussed, such as new architectures, TDCs and DCOs with high figure of merit, and digital-to-time converters.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WSG-1: Methods of distributed synchronization in future wireless networks
Jaber Khoja, Rockwell Collins, Roger Dana, Rockwell Collins
Abstract
WSG-2: Survey of Recent Advances in Microwave Frequency Synthesizers for Next generation Radar, Cellular and Satellite Systems
Ed Balboni, Analog Devices
Abstract
WSG-3: Improved frequency stability in low power consuming oscillators and clocks: CSAC, MEMS and dual-mode crystal oscillators
Vladimir Stofanik, Slovak Univ. of Technology in Bratislava
Abstract
WSG-4: Low Noise Sapphire Resonator and Oscillators
Michael Tobar, School of Physics, The University of Western Australia
Abstract
WSG-5: VIDA Products Developed Miniaturized YIG Oscillators Enabled by Differential YIG Resonators
Allen Sweet, Charles Fields
Ronald Parrott, VIDA Products
Abstract
WSG-6: Millimeter-Wave Injection-Locked CMOS Frequency Synthesizers
Howard Luong, Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology
Abstract
WSG-7: Prediction and Mitigation of Spurs and Phase Noise in Fractional Synthesizers
Gord Allan, Analog Devices
Abstract
WSG-8: CMOS/SiGe Millimeter-Wave Frequency Generation
Mona Mostafa Hella, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Abstract
WSG-9: Injection Locking Techniques for Low-power Millimeter-wave Phased Array Circuitry
James Buckwalter, Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California - Santa Barbara (UCSB),
Yuan-Hung Chung, Jean-Baptiste Begueret
MediaTek Inc., Univ. of Bordeaux
Location
105A
Abstract

The ubiquitous wireless connectivity keeps driving the development of high-performance/low-power wireless systems and building blocks for next generation transceivers.
Today, the best and faster performances are provided by the 802.11ac standard, delivering speeds up to several Gbps. To achieve these data rate levels, the 11ac works exclusively in the 5 GHz band in which wide bandwidths (80/160 MHz) are available. Nevertheless, to improve the speed, the next generation, the 802.11 ax, answers this issue precisely: this technology will allow to quadruple the average data rate per user in a dense environment. The 11ax standard uses both 2.4 & 5GHz bands, wide channels (40 MHz, 80 MHz & 160 MHz) and high order modulations (1024 QAM).
The key technologies will be presented on how to achieve wider bandwidth, higher linearity, lower power consumption, better EVM, and highly integration, such as fulfilling the requirements of 802.11ax standard. Moreover, the workshop will present/discuss digital and mixed-signal techniques for correcting RF and analog imperfections of a WLAN transceiver circuits.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WSH-1: Discrete-Time Approach to Push High-Performance in WLAN Receivers
Iman Madadi, Massoud Tohidian
R. Bogdan Staszewski, University College Dublin (UCD)
Abstract
WSH-2: Polar Transmitter Calibration in 22nm FDSOI
Thomas Mckay, GLOBALFOUNDRIES Santa Clara
Abstract
WSH-3: A 2.4-GHz high-efficiency multilevel outphasing WLAN transmitter and an integration RF subsampling receiver for adaptive PA linearization.
Philip A. Godoy, Taylor W. Barton, Joel L. Dawson
SungWon Chung, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
Abstract
WSH-4: WLAN Digital Power Amplifiers, Circuit & Calibration Techniques
Renaldi Winoto, Tectus Corp.
Abstract
WSH-5: Challenges in WLAN Front End Modules Designs Supporting the Proposed 802.11ax Standard
Bill Vaillancourt
Darcy Poulin, Skyworks Solutions
Abstract
WSH-6: WiFi Access Point Front End Module Trends and Challenges
Bob Baeten
Brad Nelson, Qorvo
Abstract
WSH-7: High-Performance CMOS Frequency Synthesizer for WLAN Applications
Kenichi Okada, Tokyo Institute of Technology
Abstract
WSH-8: High Performance Frequency Synthesis with Digital Calibration Techniques
Fa Foster Dai, Auburn University, USA
Abstract
WSH-9: Analog-to-Digital Converter Architecture for Low-power and High-speed operation in Emerging Wireless Systems
Jae-Won Nam
Mike Shuo-Wei Chen, Univ. of Southern California
Jeffrey Walling, Ayman Fayed, Debopriyo Chowdhury
Univ. of Utah, Ohio State Univ., Broadcom Limited
Location
107B
Abstract

The “wireless revolution” is forcing the wireless industry to bring down consumer cost for wireless devices, while simultaneously increasing speed and performance. Consequently, RF transceivers are being implemented in CMOS digital integrated circuit (IC) processes. But, this poses design challenges for achieving watt-level RF power transmission that meets the spectral purity requirements of future wideband wireless communications. This workshop discusses the state-of-the-art architectures and trends for achieving RF power across the fields of devices, circuits and systems. We will explore options for power amplifiers (PAs) from the device level with presentations on GaN devices, to the power amplifier level, with presentations on CMOS and GaN PAs for emerging wireless communications solutions frequencies, and to the system level, with presentations on employing envelope tracking and on approaches for system level linearization.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WSI-1: An Introduction to High-Frequency GaN-based High Electron Mobility Transistors
Siddharth Rajan, Ohio State Univ.
Abstract
WSI-2: Efficiency-Enhancement of GaN PAs for 5G transmitters
Zoya Popovic, Univ. of Colorado
Abstract
WSI-3: CMOS PA design at mm-wave frequencies
Patrick Reynaert, KU Leuven
Abstract
WSI-4: Envelope Tracking for 5G transmitters
Donald Kimball, Maxentric
Abstract
WSI-5: A Wideband Envelope Tracking Solution for WLAN Systems
Debopriyo Chowdhury, Broadcom Limited
Abstract
WSI-6: Linearity, bandwidth, and back-off efficiency enhancement design techniques for GHz digitally intensive CMOS power amplifiers
Jongseok Park, Georgia Tech University
Mona Hella, Didier Belot, Pierre BUSSON
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, CEA-LETI Grenoble, ST Microelectronics
Location
105B
Abstract

Abstract: This workshop discusses advanced manufacturing, packaging and testing techniques for mmWave systems. Topics include plastic waveguides, on-chip antenna arrays, wafer scale integration, as well as calibration and testing issues. New approaches for in-situ measurement of individual element’s response in large phased array systems are also presented. The workshop aims to bring together experts from academia, industry and research labs to discuss the implementation and testing challenges and solutions for next generation wireless applications.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WSJ-1: Packaging Approaches for mm-wave Applications
Tanja Braun, Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration
Abstract
WSJ-2: Antenna Arrays in the mm-Wave Band
Kubilay Sertel, ElectroScience Laboratory, The Ohio State University
Abstract
WSJ-3: Code-Modulated Embedded Test for MM-wave Phased Array
Brian Floyd, ECE Dept., NC State University
Abstract
WSJ-4: Built-in-Self-Test Methods for Phased-Array Beamforming ICs
Gabriel Rebeiz, UC San Diego
Abstract
WSJ-5: Millimeter Wave Testing: the Struggle between Feasibility and Mass Production Support
Mustapha Slamani, Global Foundries
Abstract
WSJ-6: Plastic is fantastic: How a cheap material could become the next high data rate communication channel
Baudouin Martineau, CEA-LETI Grenoble
Abstract
WSJ-7: Packaging Solution for Low Cost Si based 100 Gb/s Wireless Links
Frederic Gianesello, ST-Micro Crolles
Abstract
WSJ-8: Polymer Microwave Fibers: A high-speed, robust and low-cost alternative to copper and optical wireline communication
Patrick Reynaert, University of Leuven (KU Leuven)

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Eric Klumperink, Waleed Khalil
Univ. of Twente, Ohio State Univerisy
Location
109B
Abstract

With significant advances in digital CMOS and fTs reaching 300GHz, the direct digital-to-RF interface as well as early digitization becomes an increasingly more viable solution. RF systems hence increasingly use data-converters closer to the RF-port, as Moore’s law makes digital signal processing in CMOS ever more powerful and cost effective. Direct digitization/analogization is still feasible only for certain applications, as dynamic range and speed requirements of the ADC and DAC often lead to a feasibility or power bottleneck. This workshop will review the state-of-the-art and trends in highly digital RF systems, highlighting key design challenges in different application domains as well as architectural solutions to address them. Techniques like channelization and time/frequency interleaving that can relax ADC and DAC requirements will be discussed as well as application examples. Finally, the workshop will review photonics-based data converters as they offer a compelling solution to the performance bounds set by sampling clock jitter.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WSK-1: Theoretical Comparison of Direct-Sampling vs. Heterodyne RF Receivers
Ramon Gomez, Univ. of California, Irvine
Abstract
WSK-2: Architectures for frequency-domain channelization of broadband signals
Ranjit Gharpurey, Univ. of Texas at Austin
Abstract
WSK-3: RF-sampling DACs and ADCs integrated in 16nm FinFet SoCs
Bruno Vaz, Xilinx, Christophe Erdmann, Xilinx
Abstract
WSK-4: Photonic Analog to Digital Converters for Direct Digital Receivers
Ronald Esman, Oliver King, Thomas Cullen, Daniel Esman
Altin Pelteku, Rockwell Collins, Inc.
Yanjie wang, Yao-Hong Liu
Intel Labs, IMEC
Location
104AB
Abstract

INTERNET-OF-THINGS (IOT) is regarded as one important part of the future 5G mobile communication, and draws much attention from both academia and industry in recent years. Due to the expansion of IoT and especially wearable sensors, remote personal monitoring based on the huge amount of real-time data streams has become a huge trend in the healthcare and wellbeing domains. IoT edge nodes continue to integrate increasingly complex sensing, compute, and connectivity capabilities into smaller form factors, while pursuing energy autonomy through multi-modal energy harvesting. This workshop explores the IOT designer’s perspective on RFIC front-end, system designs/innovations, antenna/antenna-array designs, integrated sensors, packaging designs, as well as leading edge solutions available to energy harvesting, power management, etc.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WSL-1: Ultra Low Power Crystal Free Radios
Ali Niknejad, UC Berkeley, Osama Khan, UC Berkeley
Abstract
WSL-2: Ultra-Narrow Band communications
David Lachartre, CEA-LETI
Abstract
WSL-3: An Ultra-Low Power Dual-Core ARM®-Based Wireless MCU in 40 nm RF-NV CMOS for Battery Supplied IoT Applications
Jean-Robert Tourret, NXP
Abstract
WSL-4: A Bidirectional Terahertz Pico-Radio in CMOS for Wireless Sensor Networks and Internet of Things
Taiyun Chi, Speed Wireless
Abstract
WSL-5: Energy-Efficient Proprietary Transceivers for IoT and Smartphone-Based WPAN
Woogeun Rhee, Tsinghua Univ.

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Dieter Haemmerich, Punit Prakash, Dario Rodrigues, Paul Stauffer
Med. Univ of South Carolina, Kansas State Univ., Thomas Jefferson Univ.
Abstract

Radiofrequency and microwave technologies are in widespread use for diverse therapeutic applications. Computer models play an important role in the design and optimization of medical devices, analysis of devices in varying physiological and anatomical scenarios, and for patient-specific treatment planning. This short course will present the use of computer models in the design of radiofrequency and microwave medical devices, and application of models for planning and analysis of therapeutic procedures. The short course will commence with an overview of the finite element method and an introduction to the COMSOL Multiphysics modeling environment. Additional sessions will cover: computer modeling of radiofrequency devices; model-based design of microwave ablation devices and treatment delivery strategies; multiphysics modeling to tailor microwave hyperthermia profiles in superficial tumor targets with water bolus coupled waveguide applicators; and microwave radiometry for non-invasive measurement of tissue temperatures.

Robert Schmid, Hasan Sharifi
Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, HRL Labs
Location
104AB
Abstract

Radiometers precisely measure the electromagnetic radiation that is passively emitted by physical media. At microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies, radiometers can provide useful remote sensing observations under adverse conditions (rain, fog, etc.) and without external illumination where infrared and optical sensors fail. Over the past decade, both the underlying semiconductor technologies and the application spaces of radiometers have evolved significantly.
The continued performance increases of advanced node CMOS and scaled SiGe HBTs have enabled the development of radiometers for applications requiring low cost, high volume, and miniaturization. In addition, the recent development of terahertz InP/InGaAs HEMTs have enabled high-resolution radiometry at previously inaccessible frequencies. These advances necessitate a re-evaluation of architecture and technology tradeoffs to fully leverage the unique capabilities enabled by these technologies. Furthermore, while radiometers have traditionally been limited to use in niche scientific and military applications, the application spaces of these systems have grown substantially. Passive imaging systems are now widely implemented for public security, and noninvasive subcutaneous sensing radiometers are increasingly utilized for medical applications. In addition, the proliferation of CubeSats has created a demand for highly integrated radiometers which can enable continuous observations of the Earth’s atmosphere and yield improved weather forecasting and climate modeling.
This workshop will discuss radiometer theory and system architectures, and will highlight current state-of-the-art microwave and millimeter-wave radiometers in security imaging and scientific applications. A comparison of these systems will show the how the varying application spaces impose requirements which flow down through the system architecture and component designs to the semiconductor technologies. Calibration procedures and techniques for validating, operating, and ensuring accurate data retrieval from these systems will also be discussed.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WMH-1: CMOS Systems-on-Chip for NASA Radiometry and Spectroscopy from microwave to THz
Adrian Tang, Jet Propulsion Lab
Abstract
WMH-2: Millimeter-Wave Radiometers at 94 GHz and 140 GHz using Advanced SiGe
Gabriel Rebeiz, University of California San Diego
Abstract
WMH-3: Low Noise Radiometers for Passive Millimeter Wave Imaging
Harris Moyer, HRL Laboratories, LLC
Abstract
WMH-4: An overview of millimeter wave radiometry: imaging phenomenology and applications
David Wikner, US Army Research Laboratory
Abstract
WMH-5: Microwave Radiometers for Earth Observation from Space
Jeff Piepmeier, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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Jan-Christoph Edelmann, Thomas Ussmueller, Luciano Tarricone, Giuseppina Monti
Department of Mechatronics, Microelectronics & Implantable Systems, University of Innsbruck, Austria, Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Lecce, Italy, Department of Innovation Engineering, University of Salento, Lecce, Italy
Location
106AB
Abstract

The workshop addresses general issues related to the development of implantable and wearable systems, with a specific focus on healthcare and medical applications. To start with, the use of wireless implantable devices for both power and data transmission is addressed. This includes a scientific review dealing with the problem of communicating between implants and externals whereby crossing human tissue layers (biological matter is a hostile environment for radiofrequency-based communication). As per wearable systems, topics covered include ultra-low-power microwave components and systems, epidermal radioelectronics, eco-compatible substrates for minimally-invasive wearable devices, harvesting issues in the case of miniaturized wearable devices, as well as technological key-factors like the use of 3D/4D inkjet printing for manufacturing. In a nutshell, the workshop provides an extensive overview covering the main theoretical background and technological key-points for cutting-edge research and applications in the addressed area. A panel discussion will conclude the event stimulating interactions among attendees, speakers and chairmen.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WMA-1: Hello from the Other Side: Communication Between Implants and Externals
John Stockton, Abbott Laboratories
Abstract
WMA-2: Resonant Inductive Wireless Power Transfer Link for Rechargeable Pacemakers
Giuseppina Monti, Maria Valeria De Paolis, Laura Corchia
Luciano Tarricone, Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Lecce, Italy
Abstract
WMA-3: Wireless Power and Antennas for Bio-Implants
Yong-Xin Guo, National Univ. of Singapore
Abstract
WMA-4: A Novel Measurement Approach for Inductive Through-the-Head Coupling
Dominik Mair, Thomas Ussmueller
Jan-Christoph Edelmann, Department of Mechatronics, Microelectronics & Implantable Systems, University of Innsbruck, Austria
Abstract
WMA-5: Efficient Antenna Design Process for Wireless Wearable and Implantable Devices
C. J. Reddy, Altair Engineering, Inc.
Abstract
WMA-6: Epidermal Radioelectronics: The Next Frontier of Wearable Systems
Gaetano Marrocco, University of Roma Tor Vergata - Pervasive Electromagnetics Lab
Abstract
WMA-7: 3D/4D/Inkjet-Printed RF Wearable and Implantable Modules for Smart Skin and Health Monitoring Applications
Manos M. Tentzeris, Ken Byers Professor in Flexible Electronics, Georgia Tech
Abstract
WMA-8: Compact Transparent Thin Film Antenna for Wearable Device
Hung-Wei Wu, Kun Shan University, Taiwan
Abstract
WMA-9: Smart Powering of Wearable and Eco-Compatible Tags
Alessandra Costanzo
Diego Masotti, Univ. of Bologna, Italy
Abstract
WMA-10: Ultra-Low Power Microwave Components and Systems for Remote Health Monitoring Applications
Wolfgang Bösch
Jasmin Grosinger, Institute of Microwave and Photonic Engineering, Graz University of Technology, Austria
Abstract
WMA-11: Development of a Wearable Energy Harvesting Powered Device for Monitoring Honey Bee Movement
Jake Shearwood, Daisy Man Yuen Hung, Paul Cross
Cristiano Palego, Bangor University
Christian Damm, Andreas Stelzer
University of Ulm, Germany, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria
Location
109A
Abstract

Medical imaging techniques are fundamental for modern health care. The various established imaging techniques work very well in most cases, but all do have certain limitations. Sometimes they simply cannot deliver good images because there is no physical contrast effect due to low interaction between the object and the used signal, e.g. soft matter not visible in x-rays. And many times these very expensive devices are not available in sufficient number, are not portable or it is simply too expensive to take continuously images in short intervals. Especially for future Point-of-care applications it is desirable to have cheaper systems, capable of taking images at the bedside or monitor changing medical conditions over prolonged times. New microwave to THz imaging approaches offer these and even more possibilities which will not replace existing techniques but rather complement them. This workshop features imaging applications using microwave, mm-wave and THz systems for medical applications. Both sides, the theory and system design as well as the real clinical application including measurements and case studies are presented. Both areas are not treated separately but closely linked in the workshop having contributions from academia and industry with strong cooperation in between. Practitioners as well as researchers will present their results for a broad audience aiming to address the needs of electrical engineers as well as medical staff interested in the possibilities of this emerging area, the technology behind and inherent limitations. Medical applications include functional neuroimaging, diagnostic of stroke, traumatic brain injuries, burn wound assessment, surgical flap viability monitoring, breast cancer detection and ablation monitoring. Joint this workshop, have your questions answered and get in touch with renowned experts in this field during presentations and discussions.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WMB-1: On the road towards pre-hospital stroke diagnostics with a microwave system
Andreas Fhager, Chalmers University, Sweden
Abstract
WMB-2: Electromagnetic tomography for human brain imaging: application for detection of stroke, traumatic brain injuries and brain tumor
Serguei Semenov, EMTensor GmbH
Abstract
WMB-3: Multiport VNA System for Microwave Imaging
Andreas Haderer, Reinhard Feger, Andreas Stelzer
Sebastian Poltschak, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria
Abstract
WMB-4: Burn wound assessment through microwave imaging
Martin Vossiek
Daniel Oppelt, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
Abstract
WMB-5: Microwave monitoring of breast tumor ablation
Susan Hagness, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
Abstract
WMB-6: Implementation and testing of prototype systems for medical microwave imaging and sensing
Jeremie Bourqui
Elise Fear, University of Calgary, Canada
Abstract
WMB-7: In situ monitoring of surgical flap viability using THz imaging
Zachary Taylor, UCLA, USA
Manos Tentzeris, Dominique Baillargeat
Georgia Tech, XLIM Université de Limoges/CNRS, France
Location
110B
Abstract

In this workshop, the particular importance and associated opportunities of additively manufactured radio- frequency (RF) components and modules for Internet of Things (IoT), 5G, Smart Skin and millimeter-wave ubiquitous sensing applications is thoroughly discussed. First, the current advances and capabilities of additive manufacturing (AM) tools are presented. Then, completely printed chipless radio-frequency identification (RFID), RF sensing and RF communication systems, and their current capabilities and limitations are reported. The focus is then shifted toward more complex backscattering energy autonomous RF structures. For each of the essential components of these structures, that encompass energy harvesting and storage, backscattering front ends, passive components, interconnects, packaging, shape-chaging (4-D printed) topologies and sensing elements, current trends are described and representative state- of-the-art examples reported. Finally, the results of this analysis are used to argue for the unique appeal of AM RF components and systems toward empowering a technological revolution of cost- efficient dense and ubiquitous IoT implementations.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WMC-1: Additively Manufactured RF/Wireless Modules for IoT, mmW and WSN applications
Manos Tentzeris, Georgia Tech
Abstract
WMC-2: Additive manufacturing applied to microwave filters and antennas up to 60 GHz
Dominique Baillargeat
Nicolas Delhote, XLIM Université de Limoges/CNRS
Abstract
WMC-3: FHE Process Maturation for RF Applications
John D Williams, Boeing Research & Technology
Abstract
WMC-4: Energy Harvesting-enabled Self-sustainable Inkjet-printed Wireless Sensor Platform and via-enabled multi-layer printed structure for IoT Applications
Sangkil Kim, Pusan National Univ.
Abstract
WMC-5: Additive manufacturing enabling “More than Moore” innovation in the semiconductor industry
Benjamin Cook, Texas Instruments Kilby Labs
Abstract
WMC-6: Additively Manufactured Active FMCW Radar Imaging for Long-Range Wireless Passive Sensors
Herve Aubert, ENSEEIHT/LAAS CNRS, France
Abstract
WMC-7: Ink-jet printing technology: a suitable approach for sustainable flexible electronics
Henri Happy, IEMN, France
Abstract
WMC-8: Inkjet and 3D printed circuits for the Internet of Things and 5G communication systems
Spyros Daskalakis
Apostolos Georgiadis, Heriot-Watt Univ.
Abstract
WMC-9: Additively manufactured wearable electronics
Jiang Zhu, Huan Liao, Manos Tentzeris
Wenjing Su, Google
Abstract
WMC-10: 3D-Printed Millimeter-Wave Quasi-Optical Lens Systems
Arthur Paolella, Harris Corporation
Harris Moyer, Zoya Popovic
HRL Laboratories, LLC., University of Colorado, Boulder
Location
103ABC
Abstract

Proposed standards for 5G communications utilize mmW frequency bands (>28 GHz) whereas current 4G technology still operates below 6 GHz. Power amplifier performance capability will be a critical component for developing specifications for 5G base stations and handsets. In addition to cost considerations, efforts to increase linearity and improve efficiency for systems with higher order amplitude modulation will be emphasized.
Over the past decade, significant improvements in GaN technologies and further maturation of GaAs, CMOS and SiGe processes have enabled the potential for low cost production of mmW power amplifiers. Also, efficiency enhancement techniques such as Dougherty, Chireix outphasing and supply modulation are enabling amplification of signals with high peak-to-average power ratios (PAPR) such as 64QAM and 256QAM. With the frequency of operation increasing by an order of magnitude, amplifier architectures and device technologies will need to be re-evaluated to determine the proper balance between cost and overall system performance. Because the number of proposed bands widely varies and ranges from 28 to 71 GHz, there will be possibilities for multiple types of power amplifiers operating at different powers levels and frequencies.
The goal of this workshop is to present a comparison of different material systems, such as GaAs, SiGe, CMOS, InP GaN on SiC and GaN on Si, especially in terms of process maturity and cost, as well as performance at higher frequencies.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WMD-1: Qorvo 5G PA and Front End Module MMIC Technology
Michael Roberg, Qorvo, Richardson, TX
Abstract
WMD-2: GaN MMIC Technology for mmW 5G
Miroslav Micovic, HRL Laboratories, LLC.
Abstract
WMD-3: Millimeter-wave CMOS Power Amplifiers for 5G Applications
Kamran Entesari, Texas A&M Univ.
Abstract
WMD-4: Exploiting Digital Friendly CMOS Power Amplifiers and Systems for 5G Communications
Jeffrey S. Walling, Univ. of Utah
Abstract
WMD-5: RF and Millimeter-wave SiGe and SOI CMOS for High Peak and Average Efficiency
James Buckwalter, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
Abstract
WMD-6: 5G and InP HBT MMIC technology – the Prospects and Opportunities at mm-Wave
Zach Griffith, Teledyne Scientific & Imaging
Abstract
WMD-7: 100nm and 60nm GaN/Si MMICs: The optimum complement to Si MMICs for 5G Mobile Telecommunications
Marc Rocchi, OMMIC SAS
Abstract
WMD-8: GaN on Si with CMOS for Low Cost Advanced Phased Arrays
Christopher Galbraith, MIT Lincoln Labs
Abstract
WMD-9: Advanced GaAs Integration for 5G Power Amplifiers
David Danzilio, WIN Semiconductors Corp.
SungWon Chung, Hermann Boss, Noriaki Kaneda
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, Rohde & Schwarz, Munich, Germany, Nokia Bell Labs, Murray Hill, NJ, USA
Location
105A
Abstract

This workshop overviews the recent advancements in digital pre-distortion (DPD) and digital post-correction (DPC) techniques over a broad range of spectrum from DC to mmWave. Beyond the classical DPD applications on wireless and satellite power amplifier linearization, this workshop will culminate the applications of the DPD and DPC techniques for wireline and optical communications. With wireline communication, to advance the data rate limit, designers are leveraging a high-order modulation, which requires a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) based transmitter along with an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) based receiver. Since the poor linearity of high-speed data converters often becomes a performance bottleneck with such high performance wireline transceivers and also with wireline MIMO transceivers, DPC and DPD techniques become essential not only to the equalization of nonideal lossy channels but also to the linearization of nonlinearities in high-speed circuit elements. As the recent trend of using a high-order wideband modulation continues with Tb/s coherent optical communication, fiber nonlinearity has become a critical design challenge. A robust and low-power implementation of DPC and DPD, which includes the realization of nonlinearity tolerant modulation and coding schemes as well as adaptive pre-emphasis and equalization, is becoming increasingly important. This workshop for the first time brings together researchers from industry and academic working on diverse DPD and DPC techniques in wireless, wireline, and optical communications in one place, revisiting the fundamental principles in common as well as providing a unique opportunity to learn from cross-platform implementations.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WME-1: Linearization of Power Amplifiers Used in Radio Frequency Transmitters
Neil Braithwaite, Consultant, Orange, CA, USA
Abstract
WME-2: Model Order Reduction Techniques for Digital Predistortion in Highly Efficient Power Amplification Architectures
Gabriel Montoro Lopez, Thi Pham
Pere Gilabert, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
Abstract
WME-3: A Digital PLL Architecture with Digital-Signal-Processing Techniques for Spur Mitigation
Mike Chen
Cheng-Ru Ho, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Abstract
WME-4: Digital Post-Correction of Nonlinearity with Memory Effects in GaN HEMT Track-and-Hold Circuits for High Performance ADCs
Puneet Srivastava, Xi Yang, Tomás Palacios, Hae-Seung Lee
SungWon Chung, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Abstract
WME-5: A Feed Forward Equalization Transmitter Architecture which Is Robust to Coefficient Errors for High-Speed Wireline Communication
Seungho Han, Sooeun Lee, Minsoo Choi, Jae-Yoon Sim, Hong-June Park
Byungsub Kim, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Korea
Abstract
WME-6: ADC-Based Receiver Calibration and Equalization Techniques
Samuel Palermo, Texas A&M University, TX, USA
Abstract
WME-7: ADC Nonlinearity in Wireline Receivers
Anthony Carusone, University of Toronto, Canada
Abstract
WME-8: Digital Predistortion and Post Equalization Techniques in Optical Communications
Noriaki Kaneda, Nokia Bell Labs, Murray Hill, NJ
Abstract
WME-9: Digital-Preprocessed Analog-Multiplexed DAC for Ultra-high-speed Optical Transmission
Munehiko Nagatani, Fukutaro Hamaoka, Masanori Nakamura, Shigeru Kanazawa, Hideyuki Nosaka, Toshikazu Hashimoto, Yutaka Miyamoto
Hirosh Yamazaki, NTT Device Technology Laboratories, Kanagawa, Japan
Abstract
WME-10: Digital Equalization in Ultra-High Capacity Coherent Optical Transmission
David Millar, Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories, MA, USA
Katia Grenier, Rolf Jakoby, Martin Schuessler
LAAS-CNRS, France, TU Darmstadt, Germany
Location
110A
Abstract

In the microwave regime the interaction between electromagnetic fields and biological cells is characterised by strong dielectric dispersion and field penetration of the matter. The resulting biological effects are classified into thermal and non-thermal effects and their understanding is the basis for the engineering of tailored analysis tools and applicators for cell biology.
Due to the nature of the electromagnetic fields, the interaction between fields and cells is per se contactless. By proper power control, it is non-destructive, and thus by applying dielectric spectroscopy, a label free cell analysis method can be implemented. This analysis technique is highly flexible since it can be applied to a large number of cells in suspension as well as for the investigation of single cells, whereby it is possible to resolve sub-cellular structures.
Besides this sensing functionality, electrokinetic forces can be used to imprint mechanical forces on cells. There are several well established applications for forced cell movement e.g. for analysis or sorting. Forces can also be applied only to parts of cells e.g. the membrane by using CW or pulsed high frequency signals, in order to form temporary pores for the uptake of exogenous molecules.
With the evolution in these applications, more detailed modeling of the interactions between microwave EM fields and cells is needed, which requires the simultaneous consideration of thermal effects, effects of flow, cell morphology and deformation, etc.
For the realization of devices in commercially attractive lab-on-a-chip setups the integration of CMOS circuits and microfluidics offers a powerful platform. This technology even allows for multi-sensor integration e.g. for dielectric and mechanical sensors and real time characterization of cells.
The workshops intends to exemplarily highlight the state of the art in this fascinating field of research to motivate a scientific discussion on existing and future developments.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WMF-1: Mastering Electric Fields at the Atomic Level to Transport Drugs and Biomarkers Across the Plasma Membrane Into Living Cells
Henry David Herce, Harvard Medical School, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Abstract
WMF-2: Intense and Intensified Electric Fields in the Low-Permittivity Interior of the Biological Membrane — Nanoscale Reactor for Hydroxyl Radical Formation
Tom Vernier, Frank Reidy Research Center for Bioelectrics, Old Dominion University (ODU), Norfolk, Virginia, USA
Abstract
WMF-3: Dosimetry for RF and nsPEF Biomedical Investigation
Delia Arnaud-Cormos
Philippe Leveque, Xlim, CNRS-University of Limoges, France
Abstract
WMF-4: Microwave Assisted Electroporation
Soenke Schmidt, TU Darmstadt, Germany
Abstract
WMF-5: Multi-Physics Modeling and Measurements for Microwave Microfluidic Devices and Cellular Interactions
Ilja Ocket, ESAT- TELEMIC, Telecommunications and Microwaves, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10
Abstract
WMF-6: Dielectric Response of Single Cells to Applied Stress
Greg E. Bridges, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
Abstract
WMF-7: Microwave Dielectric Spectroscopy of Cells and Molecules
David Dubuc
Katia Grenier, LAAS-CNRS, Toulouse, France
Abstract
WMF-8: Measuring the Microwave Permittivity of Giant Unilamellar Vesicle Membranes
Yan Cui
Pingshan Wang, Clemson University, SC, USA
Abstract
WMF-9: Broadband Electromagnetic Characterization of Individual Biological Cells and Subcelluar Structures
James C. M. Hwang, Lehigh University, PA, USA
Abstract
WMF-10: A Microwave CMOS/Microfluidics Dielectric Spectrometer for Biosensing and Flow Cytometry
Jun-Chau Chien, Stanford University, CA, USA
Andrei Grebennikov, Marc Franco
Sumitomo Electric Europe, UK, Qorvo, NC
Location
105B
Abstract

The proposed workshop will discuss the recent advances in efficiency and linearity enhancement techniques for RF power amplification to use in modern and future generation wireless communication systems. These include both high-efficiency load-network techniques in power amplifiers such as Class F and Class E and their combinations and approximations using embedding and de-embedding nonlinear device models and advanced high-efficiency transmitter architectures based on envelope tracking, broadband Doherty, multi-level outphasing, and other load-modulated techniques using different technologies and at different frequencies including millimeter waves. Modern trends in system-level approaches including power amplifier behavioral modeling and analog/digital linearization schemes including multi-band/multi-channel power amplifier linearization will also be discussed.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WMG-1: The Role of Active Device in Power Amplifier Design
Gayle Collins, Nuvotronics, NC
Abstract
WMG-2: Class F, Class E and Their Derivatives
Mury Thian
Matthew Love, Queen's Univ. Belfast
Abstract
WMG-3: Accelerated Design of High-Efficiency RF Power Amplifiers Using Nonlinear Embedding
Patrick Roblin, Ohio State University, Columbus
Abstract
WMG-4: High-Power High-Efficiency Broadband Doherty Amplifiers
James Wong
Andrei Grebennikov, Sumitomo Electric Europe, UK
Abstract
WMG-5: Envelope Tracking for Handset Transmitters
Florinel Balteanu, Skyworks Solutions, CA
Abstract
WMG-6: Supply-Modulated GaN PAs for Broadband High-PAR Signals
Zoya Popovic, University of Colorado Boulder
Abstract
WMG-7: Load Modulation Techniques for Efficient Power Amplifiers
Taylor Barton, University of Colorado Boulder
Abstract
WMG-8: Linear and Efficient Transmitters for Active Antenna Arrays
Christian Fager, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden
Abstract
WMG-9: Digital Linearization of RF Power Amplifiers
Neil Braithwaite, Tarana Wireless, CA
Abstract
WMG-10: Multiband/Multichannel Power Amplifier Linearization
Meenakshi Rawat, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee
Abstract
WMG-11: Wideband Linearization for the Millimeter-Waves
Allen Katz, College of New Jersey/Linearizer Technology
Karun Rawat, Patrick Roblin
Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, India, Ohio State University, USA
Location
102AB
Abstract

With the advent of 5G communication era, there is huge upcoming requirement of high data rate for supporting heterogeneous network. The key requirement such as spectrum efficient modulation schemes, multiple access techniques and carrier aggregation etc. are under investigation to handle spectral as well as energy efficient radio transmission. In particular, the radio frequency (RF) and microwave power amplifiers (PAs) and transmitters should meet these challenges of high bandwidth and efficiency. This essentially requires innovations in the area of nonlinear design and characterization to develop new generation of PAs and transmitters.
This workshop will focus on the new areas explored in non-linear vector analysis and its application in developing new strategies for enhancing the PA and transmitter design. This will particularly focus on non-linear device characterization and measurement challenges for catering to the needs of 5G communication standards. The workshop will focus on following key areas targeting the demands of 5G applications:
(1) Broadband nonlinear measurements with NVNA and high efficiency PA design for handling wideband modulated signals with high crest factor.
(2) Non-linear device characterization, modeling and PA design based on non-linear embedding and other novel techniques.
(3) New digital schemes and architectures for developing non-linear behavioral model and linearization of broadband PA and wireless transmitters for 5G applications.
In addition to the above key areas, this workshop will also address the challenges in developing new digital radio front ends and massive MIMO platforms for high speed data link and throughput.
This workshop will bring together some of the leading world experts to present the novel measurement techniques and associated PA as well as linearized transmitter design schemes to cater to the upcoming needs of 5G communication.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WMJ-1: Power amplifier design using nonlinear embedding: waveform engineering at the current generator plane
Dominique Schreurs
Antonio Raffo, University of Ferrara, Italy
Abstract
WMJ-2: Bandwidth and efficiency enhancement schemes in Radio Frequency Power Amplifiers
Karun Rawat, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, India
Abstract
WMJ-3: Systematic Design of High Efficiency Doherty and Outphasing PA from Load-Pull Data
Christian Fager, Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Sweden
Abstract
WMJ-4: PA design using Simulation-Based Nonlinear-Embedding: Trust but Verify with NVNA Measurements
Patrick Roblin, Ohio State University, USA
Abstract
WMJ-5: Linearization of broadband PA and Wireless transmitters for 5G applications
Meenakshi Rawat, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, India
Abstract
WMJ-6: New approach for active devices characterization under wideband modulated signals within a coherent stimulus- response network environment
Jean Pierre Teyssier, Keysight Technologies, USA
Abstract
WMJ-7: Load Modulation Measurements of X-Band Outphasing Power Amplifiers
Zoya Popovic, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA
Abstract
WMJ-8: Non-linear device characterization and modeling for technology development and PA design
Sonja Nedeljkovic, Broadcom, Fort Collins, USA
Gabriel Rebeiz, Frank vanVliet, Domine Leenaerts
UCSD, TNO - Netherlands, NXP - Netherlands
Location
107B
Abstract

SiGe and CMOS has allowed for a ten-fold reduction in the cost of phased-array systems, and systems employing silicon beamformer chips are currently being developed for SATCOM and terrestrial point-to-point systems. This workshop presents the latest work in this area, and covers chip development, antenna development, phased-array systems, built-in-test, and several system-level demonstrators. It is shown that state-of-the-art systems can be built using silicon technologies, and that affordable phased-arrays with thousands of elements are becoming a reality.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WMK-1: Ka-band phased array for airborne terminals
Maria Carolina Viganò, ViaSat-Switzerland
Abstract
WMK-2: Modern AESA Panel Array for SatCom Applications
Patrick Schuh, Hensolt - Germany
Abstract
WMK-3: Techniques and Technologies enabling affordable SatCom Antenna Systems
F.E. van Vliet, TNO - Netherlands
Abstract
WMK-4: Single Panel Phased-Arrays for SATCOM and Low Power Radars
Lee Paulsen, Rockwell Collins - US
Abstract
WMK-5: Modular phased array antennas for SatCom at millimeter wavelengths
Tobias Chaloun, Univ. Ulm
Abstract
WMK-6: Afforrdable Ku and Ka-band SATCOM Phased-Arrays
Gabriel Rebeiz, UCSD
Abstract
WMK-7: Phased Array Development for High Altitude Platforms and Satcom at Facebook Connectivity Labs
Will Theunissen, Facebook
Abstract
WMK-8: Advanced Silicon Beamformer Chips for Ku-band and Ka-band SATCOM Systems
Tumay Kanar, IDT
Abstract
WMK-9: SiGe BiCMOS Transmitter for Ka-band satellite phased array system
Domine Leenaerts, NXP Semiconductors

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Abbas Omar
Univ. of Magdeburg
Abstract

Charged fundamental particles (electrons, protons, etc.) possess a characteristic spin magnetic moment. Applying a strong static magnetic field to an object, results in directing these spins parallel and anti-parallel to the applied magnetic field. This gives rise to two energy states, whose populations are governed by the lows of thermodynamics. If, in addition, an RF field of a certain frequency is applied for a certain duration, the spins start to precess about the direction of the static magnetic field disturbing the thermodynamic equilibrium. During the process of restoring the thermodynamic equilibrium, the spins radiate a highly coherent electromagnetic field, which can be received and used for constructing the MR images.
In this short course, the fundamentals of MRI are presented. Physical aspects related to the image construction are discussed. Technical challenges related to the design of RF coils, which are capable of generating homogeneous magnetic field (homogeneous illumination) within the object to be imaged, are emphasized. A number of well-known antenna techniques such as Beam Forming and Butler Matrix are applied to advanced Magnetic-Resonance Imaging to improve image quality and reduce artifacts . Special emphases are put on imaging systems utilizing high static magnetic fields for improving resolution.

John Pierro
Telephonics
Location
104AB
Abstract

The march toward autonomous, self-driving cars and trucks is moving faster than anyone could have imagined. The future is a sensor-laden vehicle loaded with LIDAR, optical cameras, and nearly a half-dozen radars. Sensors will be relied on to safely navigate the vehicle on roads both urban and rural, including high speed interstates, congested city streets, and rural back roads. Car manufacturers are investing heavily in the technology as are the ride-hailing services such as Uber and Lyft.
In June, 2016 a Tesla Model S self-driving car was involved in a crash with a tractor-trailer and the driver was killed. It is believed that the cause of the crash was a malfunctioning optical sensor. This example demonstrates how critical sensors are to the safe operation of the car. Now, instead of a hardware failure, imagine what could have happened if a third party were to launch an attack and intentionally disrupt the sensor’s operation? A variety of methods are available: (1) jamming, the transmission of RF signals (in the case of radar) to interfere with the radar, (2) spoofing, the replication and retransmission of radar transmit signals designed to provide false information and to corrupt data, and (3) interference, the intentional or unintentional modification or disruption of a radar signal due to unwanted signals such as signals from different automotive radars.
IMS has been very successful in drawing the best speakers and organizing very strong workshops on the latest advancements in MMW radar technology. That said, virtually nothing has been said about security issues in automotive systems such as radar and dedicated short range communications systems. This workshop is focused on starting the conversation about this important topic. Four very knowledgeable speakers with expertise in the security aspects of these complex systems will address these critical issues

Technical Papers
Abstract
WMI-1: Millimeter-Wave Automotive Radar:Background Theory, State-of-the Art, and Vulnerabilities
Domenic John Belgiovane, The Ohio State University/Orbital ATK
Abstract
WMI-2: Resilient Millimeter-Wave Radar Sensor Concepts for Secure Autonomous Transportation
Herman Jalli Ng, IHP
Abstract
WMI-3: Automated Vehicle Sensor Insecurity?
Jonathan Petit, OnBoard Security

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Dimitra Psychogiou, Michael Geiler
University of Colorado at Boulder, Metamagnetics
Location
104B
Abstract

Wireless communication, radar and electronic warfare systems are entering a new era in which the need for advanced functionality, low SWaP and low cost set contradicting requirements for their RF front-ends. In particular, the RF front-ends’ SWaP is limited by their non-reciprocal counter parts (e.g RF circulators, isolators) which either need large volume and external biasing in ferrite-based schemes or exhibit poor noise figure, power handling and dynamic range in active-based non-magnetic architectures. In order to overcome the aforementioned limitations, innovations are required in the areas of materials, process integration and modeling. Among them, the realization of devices that do not require magnetic biasing and are suitable for monolithic integration are of critical importance. It is the aim of this workshop to present recent progress in these areas by both academic and industry experts. In addition, recent developments in non-linear RF devices that exploit the presence of spin-waves in magnetic materials (i.e, frequency selective limiters and signal-to-noise enhancers) will also be presented. The first part of this workshop will focus on architectures and concepts that facilitate non-reciprocity by means of novel RF-design techniques using spatiotemporal modulation. New classes of non-reciprocal and non-linear RF devices including circulators, isolators, gyrators and antennas will be presented. The second part will focus on the design and monolithic integration of magnetic devices using self-biased materials as well as spinwave-based RF components. Lastly, recent progress on magnetic miniaturized and monolithically integrated components (M3IC), a research effort that has been initiated and supported by DARPA will also be presented.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WFE-1: Magnet-free Non-Reciprocity Using Spatio-Temporal Modulation
Andrea Alu
Andrea Alu, Advanced Science Research Center, City University of New York
Abstract
WFE-2: Integrated Non-reciprocal RF/mmWave Components and Beyond through Temporal Modulation
Harish Krishnaswamy
Harish Krishnaswamy, Department of Electrical Engineering, Columbia University
Abstract
WFE-3: Time-Varying Electromagnetic Devices: Breaking the Fundamental Limits of Passives
Yuanxun Ethan Wang
Yuanxun Ethan Wang, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, UCLA
Abstract
WFE-4: Non-linear ferrite signal processing devices
John Adam
Abstract
WFE-5: Advances in Non-reciprocal devices and materials
Vincent Harris, Michael Geiler
Abstract
WFE-6: Magnetic Miniaturized and Monolithically Integrated Components
Young-Kai Chen

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Piero Angeletti, Giovanni Toso
European Space Agency
Abstract

Multi-Beam Antennas (MBAs) find application in several fields including wireless and satellite communications, RADARs for electronic surveillance and remote sensing, science (e.g. radio telescopes), RF navigation systems, etc.
Beam-Forming Networks (BFNs) play an essential role in any antenna system relaying on a set of radiating elements to generate a beam.
Depending mainly on the antenna mission (i.e. operational frequency, pattern requirements, transmitting and/or receiving functionality, number of beams to be generated, etc.) different MBA architectures may be selected: from antenna systems completely based on independent feeds illuminating a number of reflectors, to hybrid systems based on both arrays and reflectors, from phased arrays to lens antennas.
The trade-off on the antenna solution largely involves the BFN interconnectivity and flexibility requirements, with a wide range of applicable BFN architectures with different complexity and performance.
The objective of the course is to present design principles and state-of-the-art in MBAs and BFNs.

Fabien Seyfert, Stéphane Bila
INRIA, Xlim
Location
106AB
Abstract

Today's microwave communication hardware manufacturers face more than ever the often contradictory
challenges to provide filtering equipments with a reduced footprint, exhibiting high selectivity at the edges of the pass-bands, possibly with the lowest losses, and all this of course at minimal cost. Once the choice of a particular technology has been met, often dictated by the implementation of the end application, the remaining optimization margin resides essentially in the selected synthesis technique used to design and tune the hardware. In this workshop we will focus on advanced design procedures dedicated, in particular, to the reduction of the hardware's footprint. For example design procedures allowing the manufacturing
of inline filters implementing transmission zeros for highly selective responses will be presented, as well as the use of multi-mode cavities for the realisation of mult-iband filters and multiplexers will be presented. Advanced synthesis and tuning techniques for the design of waveguide filters and multiplexers, used for example in space applications where the size issue is particularly acute and a co-design
technique for antenna filters that allows to implement the matching network within the filtering device itself will also be detailed.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WFD-1: Novel synthesis techniques for compact inline filters with transmission zeros
Simone Bastioli, Richard Snyder
Giuseppe Macchiarella, Politecnico di Milano
Abstract
WFD-2: Novel solutions for the synthesis and practical design of waveguide filters and multiplexers for space applications
Vicente Boria
Santiago Cogollos, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia
Abstract
WFD-3: Analytical Circuit Model Extraction for Computer Aided Tuning of Microwave Filters and Diplexers
Ke-Li Wu, Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong
Abstract
WFD-4: Synthesis and Design of Multi-band Filters Employing Multi-mode Resonators
Raafat Mansour, Ming Yu
Li Zhu, Honeywell
Abstract
WFD-5: An convex optimization approach to the matching problem: application to the co-conception of antenna filters
David Martinez, Gibin Bose, Stephane Bila
Fabien Seyfert, INRIA

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Steven Bowers, Songbin Gong, N. Scott Barker
Univ. of Virginia, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Location
104AB
Abstract

Continued expansion of the internet of things (IoT) into more and ever smaller devices requires development of low power and ultra low power communications radios. The receivers for these devices can be particularly challenging as they seek to increase sensitivity in a noisy and interference filled environment while maintaining low dc power levels needed to maximize time between battery charges or to enable the complete elimination of the battery all together in favor of energy harvesting. Many of these devices are parts of sensor nodes, which spend the majority of their time in an asleep-yet-alert state where a wakeup receiver is the only powered on block. In such scenarios, the power consumption of the receiver can become the dominant power consumer of the entire node. While much of the work up to this point has been in CMOS integrated circuits, new research in other technologies such as MEMs based receivers also show promise for the future. This workshop will address the design challenges associated with developing low power receivers for IoT applications including tradeoffs between RF frequency, data rate, sensitivity, power, and technology. Prominent researchers from both academia and industry will give insight into their individual design philosophy and vision for where the field is headed, followed by a moderated panel discussion to try to reconcile differences in their visions and take additional questions from attendee.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WFA-1: Recent Trends in Ultra-Low Power Radios
David Wentzloff, Univ. of Michigan
Abstract
WFA-2: Nanowatt wake-up receivers: exploring power and sensitivity trade-offs
Patrick Mercier, Univ. of California, San Diego
Abstract
WFA-3: Radio frequency Micro-systems for IoT inspired Front-end Signal Processing
Songbin Gong, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Abstract
WFA-4: Resonant Micromechanical Receivers
Gianluca Piazza, Carnegie Mellon Univ.
Abstract
WFA-5: Design Considerations of ultra low power radios for the IoT
Nathan Roberts, PsiKick Inc.
Abstract
WFA-6: Wirelessly-powered Centimeter-Scale Nanowatt Radios in CMOS
Arun Natarajan, Oregon State Univ.
Abstract
WFA-7: Ultra-low power receivers in highly scaled CMOS
Brent Carlton, Intel
Abstract
WFA-8: Muting the Chatter: Maintaining sensitivity of nanowatt receivers in high interference environments
Steven Bowers, Univ. of Virginia
Vadim Issakov, Uwe Rueddenklau, Amelie Hagelauer
Infineon Technologies, University Erlangen
Location
103A
Abstract

The 5th generation (5G) wireless systems are the proposed telecommunication standards, which offer the next major disruptive technological step in mobile communications. The future 5G systems aim at much higher data rates, higher density of mobiles users, lower network latency, spectral efficiency and enhanced signaling compared to the existing 4G systems. To achieve these goals, the operation will be extended to new frequency bands at mm-wave frequencies. Additionally, massive MIMO systems and novel system architectures like digital, hybrid or analog beamforming are expected to be extensively employed. Therefore, major research efforts towards 5G are focusing nowadays on RF front-ends beamforming transceivers and antenna arrays at mm-wave frequencies. Numerous new technological challenges need to be resolved not only on the level of portable user equipment (UE), but also on the level of wireless radio access networks (RAN) and backhaul, including macro-, micro and pico-cells. Particularly, the RAN infrastructure needs to support for 5G much higher data rates and enormous amount of data, as required by enhanced Mobile Broadband (eMBB) applications.
The goal of this full-day workshop is to address the transition from the current state-of-the-art 4G systems towards 5G with a particular focus on challenges related to hardware implementation of RF Front-End Modules (FEMs), beamforming transceivers and antenna arrays. Speakers from leading companies and academia will present several aspects related to semiconductor technology choice, circuit design techniques, novel system architectures, packaging, antenna arrays and network considerations. The talks will distinguish between challenges related to mobile radio user-equipment on the one hand, but also on the base-stations and backhaul networks on the other hand. A brief concluding discussion will round-off the workshop to summarize the key learnings on the wide range of aspects presented during the day.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WFB-1: Millimeter-wave RF Front-Ends for Enhanced Mobile Communications towards 5G. An industry view
Renato Lombardi, Huawei Technologies, Research Center, Italy
Abstract
WFB-2: mm-wave Front-End Challenges for 5G Base Stations
Kristoffer Andersson, Ericsson, Sweden
Abstract
WFB-3: Power Amplifier Implementation Challenges in Front-Ends for 5G mobile Broadband
Sergio Pires, Ampleon Netherlands B.V., Netherlands
Abstract
WFB-4: Modular Phased-Array Solution with Beam-Steering Antennas for 5G Millimeter-Wave RAN
Andrea Malignaggi, Dietmar Kissinger
Nebojsa Maletic, IHP, Frankfurt (Oder), Germany
Abstract
WFB-5: Considerations on Architectures and the technology implications for 5G Front-ends
Anirban Bandyopadhyay, Global Foundries, NY, USA
Abstract
WFB-6: Antenna in Package Integration for 5G and Beyond
Thomas Zwick
Mario Pauli, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Abstract
WFB-7: System considerations for 5G mm-Wave Transceiver RAN vs. UE
Stefan Schindler, Michael Wilhelm, Hans-Peter Friedrich, Uwe Rueddenklau, Ludger Verweyen
Vadim Issakov, Infineon Technologies
Abstract
WFB-8: Challenges and Opportunities of mmWave for 5G Mobile Radio
Jonathan Jensen, Intel Corporation, Hilsboro, USA
Abstract
WFB-9: 28GHz CMOS Phased-Array Transceiver for 5G New Radio
Kenichi Okada, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan
Abstract
WFB-10: mmWave RF Front-Ends for 5G
Mark Ingels
Barend van Liempd, imec vzw, Belgium
Guoan WANG, Xun Luo, Roberto Gómez-García, Dimitra Psychogiou
Univ. of South Carolina, Univ. of Electronic Science and Technology of China, University of Alcalá, Univ. of Colorado
Location
105B
Abstract

With the rapid development of the current and next generation communications (i.e., 5G wireless, internet-of-everything, and so on), multi-band and multifunction transceivers to meet the requirements of such system remain as great challenges. Thus, frequency and bandwidth tunable passive circuits with high performance as key elements in multi-band systems are dramatically demanded and highly developed based on novel materials, miniaturized structures and specific technologies, which can be utilized for the implementation of multi-band RF, microwave, millimeter-wave, and THz communication systems. This unique workshop focuses, for the first time, on the area of various tunable multi-band passive circuits by reporting recent research findings with the coverage of new materials, design techniques, and various technologies in this exciting field. This includes tunable passives with the application of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric thin films, phase change materials, liquid metal loaded technology, micro-electromechanical-system (MEMS), as well as other state-of-art design techniques for multiband operation. Meanwhile, novel on-chip tunable passive circuits (e.g., phase shifter) for 5G wireless communication system using advanced CMOS and SiGe are reported, which are widely used in the practical application of RF, microwave, mm-wave, and THz integrated circuits. The metamaterial and plasmonic devices are also introduced for compact CMOS passive integration. Furthermore, multi-function filtering components and integrated antenna sub-system, along with SAW-based-resonator technologies for the realization of advanced compact microwave filtering devices, are described. Recent advances on reconfigurable and multi-band filters in 3-D and substrate-integrated technologies are also presented.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WFF-1: Reconfigurable front-end components for smart radio applications
Mina Rais-Zadeh, University of Michigan/JPL
Abstract
WFF-2: Switchable and Tunable Ferroelectric Devices for Adaptive and Reconfigurable RF Circuits
Amir Mortazawi, Univ. of Michigan
Abstract
WFF-3: Perovskite ferroelectric and multiferroic RF tunable capacitors
Yong-Kyu Yoon, Univ. of Florida
Abstract
WFF-4: Tunable transmission lines for on-chip tuning and RF phase shifting front ends
Alberto Valdes-Garcia, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center
Abstract
WFF-5: Single-Chip Multi-Frequency Radio Frequency Passive Components Based on Aluminum Nitride Cross-Sectional Lamé Mode MEMS Resonators
Matteo Rinaldi, Northeastern Univ.
Abstract
WFF-6: Microfluidically Loaded Wideband Frequency Tunable Antennas and RF Filters
Gokhan Mumcu, Univ. of South Florida
Abstract
WFF-7: Tunable Passive Circuits for Wireless Multi-Band Application
Xun Luo, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China/Huawei Technologies Co.
Abstract
WFF-8: New concepts for absorptive RF filtering and coupling-less RF tuning
Roberto Gómez-García, Univ. of Alcala
Abstract
WFF-9: Reconfigurable Circuits for Multi-band Application Based on Different Two-port Impedance Matching Networks
Wenquan Che, Nanjing Univ. of Science and Technology
Abstract
WFF-10: Reconfigurable and Multi-Band Filters in 3-D and Substrate-Integrated-Cavity Technologies
Vicente Boria-Esbert, Technical Univ of Valencia
Abstract
WFF-11: High Resolution Tunable Delay lines
Raffat Mansour, Univ. of Waterloo
Abstract
WFF-12: High-power Reconfigurable Microwave and Millimeter-wave Devices
Dimitrios Peroulis
John Wood
Obsidian Microwave, LLC, Raleigh, NC
Location
107B
Abstract

Linearity is now a required specification in many power amplifier designs. Linearization techniques are being applied to achieve these specifications; for example, digital pre-distortion (DPD) is now ubiquitous in cellular wireless downlink base-station transmitters. As the demand for data continues to rise, features such as increased bandwidths, increased frequencies, and use of spectrally-efficient communications signals are being deployed to meet this demand. These features place significant challenges on the linearization techniques employed, and new techniques have been and continue to be developed to meet these challenges.
In this workshop we shall review some recent advances in algorithmic techniques and approaches, system design, and practical software and hardware implementations of linearization systems for next-generation wireless communications. We shall address multi-carrier and multi-band communications, wide bandwidths, high peak-to-average power ratio signals, from RF through millimeter-wave, with applications in cellular wireless, satellite communications, uplink and downlink, small-cell and macro base stations, backhaul, point-to-point radio. The workshop will host speakers with world-class reputations from academia and industry, and also showcase some recent research developments. We are planning to have demonstrations of practical state-of-the-art commercial systems. This will be an advanced workshop, for academics and industry professionals active in linearization & DPD development for RF, microwave, and millimeter-wave applications.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WFG-1: Advances in Analog Linearization for Satellite Communications
Allen Katz, The College of New Jersey/Linearizer Technology, Inc.
Abstract
WFG-2: Digital Predistortion for Wireless Transmitters in 5G: System Requirements and Design Challenges
Anding Zhu, University College Dublin, Ireland
Abstract
WFG-3: Digital Predistortion Linearization for Power Efficient Wideband Communication Systems.
Pere Gilabert, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC-Barcelona Tech.), Spain.
Abstract
WFG-4: Intermodulation Mitigation in Concurrent Multi-band PAs using Multi-band Predistortion Techniques
Mayada Younis, Abubaker Abdelhafiz
Fadhel Ghannouchi, iRadio Lab, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Abstract
WFG-5: Undersampling Based Wideband and Low-complexity Digital Pre-distortion System for 5G
Ziming Wang, National University of Ireland Maynooth, Ireland
Abstract
WFG-6: Causes, Identification and Compensation of Short-, Medium- and Long-Term Memory Effects in Power Amplifiers
Telmo Cunha, Pedro Lavrador, Pedro Cabral, Luis Nunes, Jose Carlos Pedro
Filipe Barradas, Instituto de Telecomunicações, DETI, Universidade de Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
Abstract
WFG-7: System-level Design Considerations for Digital Predistortion of Wireless Base Station Transmitters
John Wood, Obsidian Microwave, LLC, Raleigh, NC
Abstract
WFG-8: Elevating Radio Performance to New Thresholds in Wireless Communication Systems
Kevin Chuang, NanoSemi, Inc., Boston, MA
Kamal Samanta, Telesphor Kamgaing, Alberto Valdes garcia
Sony Europe, UK, Intel Corp., IBM T. J. Watson Research Center
Location
103B
Abstract

Rapidly growing demand for broadband cellular data traffic is driving fifth generation (5G) standardization towards deployment by 2020. One anticipated key to enabling gigabit-per-second 5G speeds is Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) operation. mm-wave bands offer 50 times the bandwidth available in existing RF bands but pose numerous technical challenges to the low-cost deployment of radio solutions. U.S. regulators recently issued a notice of inquiry for provision of mobile services in several frequency bands above 24 GHz. Additionally, reliable coverage over the typical 200 meter cell radius in non-line-of-sight dense urban conditions, and practical antenna array solutions for base station and user equipment (UE) have been demonstrated at 28 GHz and other mm-wave frequencies. High-volume implementation of the UE radio is also envisioned as multiple-element phased-array transceiver in silicon and/or III-V technologies. However, packaging constitutes a great technical challenge as co-design and co-integration of the transceiver and package will be critical in meeting both electrical and thermo-mechanical requirements in various applications ranging from handsets and backhaul radios to base stations.
This workshop will focus on gathering a combination of academic and industry experts in mm-wave system integration and packaging to discuss novel integrated circuits, modules, and antenna solutions for potential mm-wave 5G radios. The speakers will present state-of-the-art research results in this area and ultimately help participants identify the enabling radio and packaging technologies for 5G cellular communications. Emphasis will be put on novel 3D integration approaches and advanced mm-wave system-on-package architectures based on IC/Package/antenna co-optimization. Novel materials and thermo-mechanical challenges associated with compact and large phased array systems in silicon and III-V technologies will also be discussed for 5G radios in different mm-wave frequency bands including 28 GHz, 39 GHz, 69 GHz, 67 GHz, 73 GHz and forward-looking frequencies above 90 GHz.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WFH-1: Integration and packaging of 5G and millimeter wave compact radio modules
Tauno Vähä-Heikkilä
Tauno Vähä-Heikkilä, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland
Abstract
WFH-2: PCB interconnection concepts for highly integrated Ka-band antenna for 5G and satcom front-ends
Marta Martinez, Jens Leiß, Rens Baggen, Constantine Kakoyiannis
Marta Martinez, IMST GmbH, Germany
Abstract
WFH-3: Advances in Polyjet- and Aerosoljet-printed Millimeter-wave Packages
Premjeet Chahal, John Papapolymerou
Premjeet Chahal, Michigan State Univ.
Abstract
WFH-4: mmWave packaging and integration for 5G base station and portable devices
Xiaoxiong Gu
Xiaoxiong Gu, IBM Research
Abstract
WFH-5: Silicon Based System on Package Phased Array Design for 5G
Danny Elad, Ofer Markish, Oded Katz, Benny Sheinman
Danny Elad, On Semiconductor, Israel
Abstract
WFH-6: Wafer-Scale Compatible mm-Wave Dual-Polarization Antenna Co-integration in Silicon
Arun Natarajan
Arun Natarajan, Oregon State Univ.
Abstract
WFH-7: Millimeter Wave Integrated Antenna Solutions
Loïc Marnat
Loïc Marnat, CEA-LETI
Abstract
WFH-8: Millimeter wave phased array antenna and front end co-design for smartphones and small cells.
Yu-Chin Ou
Yu-Chin Ou, Qualcomm
Pierre Blondy, Raafat Mansour
XLIM CNRS Universite de Limoges, Univ. of Waterloo
Location
105A
Abstract

Front-end reconfigurability is becoming one of the most critical functions of wireless communication systems. While semiconductor technology has advanced considerably over the past years, the technology still suffers from series limitations, which limits its use in reconfigurable circuits at millimetre-wave frequencies and in high power applications. Research groups from industry and academia are developing innovative approaches for switchable/reconfigurable front-ends using new technologies and materials such as plasmas technologies, and active electromagnetic surfaces. This workshop will present the latest technology developments in the areas of tuning and switching, with a good balance between presentations from industry and academia, covering both high power and millimetre-wave applications.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WFI-1: Analog Devices MEMS Switch technology, a new switching solution for RF instrumentation from 0Hz/DC to 67GHz applications.
Eric Carty, Analog Devices
Abstract
WFI-2: The material importance for reliable RF MEMS
Chris Keimel, Menlo Micro
Abstract
WFI-3: Application of RF MEMS variable capacitors and switches in aperture tuned antenna design
Paul Tornatta, Cavendish Kinetics
Abstract
WFI-4: High Power Latching-Type MEMS Switches for RF Tuning
Raafat Mansour, Univ. of Waterloo
Abstract
WFI-5: MEMS & PCM Switches for Reconfigurable Millimeter-wave Circuits
Aurelian Crunteanu
Pierre Blondy, XLIM CNRS Universite de Limoges
Abstract
WFI-6: Chalcogenide Phase-Change Material Switches for RF Switching and Tuning Applications
Nabil El Hinnawy, TowerJazz
Abstract
WFI-7: Plasma technology for high-power limiters, switches and tuners
Dimitrios Peroulis, Purdue Univ.
Abstract
WFI-8: Transistor based Active Tunable and Switchable Metasurface
Daniel Sievenpiper
Li Aobo, University of California at San Diego
Gayle Collins, Frederick Raab
Obsidian Microwave, Green Mountain Radio Research
Location
103C
Abstract

New materials and technologies are providing designers with the opportunity to produce solutions that could not be accomplished in the past, opening up new avenues for innovative power amplifier (PA) design. Multistandard requirements for wireless infrastructure are driving the need for broadband PAs capable of achieving performance across several bands. The requirement for power at ever-increasing frequencies is driving the development of n-dimensional power combiners and multi-input multi-output systems (MIMO). The complexity of the communication systems is driving a need to go beyond traditional approaches to impedance matching circuits and use such techniques as network synthesis.
Network synthesis requires an understanding of the components of a dynamically interacting system and designing a network that ensures the desired performance. It is used widely in control, robotics and mechanical design and in the field of PA design the output matching network is often considered to be solely a passive circuit rather than part of a dynamic non-linear system. Network synthesis provides a method of designing an interactive system given a desired frequency- or time-domain response, with metrics such as power, efficiency and linearity. Such a system may include a passive or non-passive network that interacts with an active, often non-linear device: the power transistor.
In this workshop we will present the motivation for the application of network synthesis to power amplifier design. The successful application of network synthesis to Doherty design and switch mode PAs will be presented as well as approaches such as the Real Frequency Technique to increase the bandwidth of traditionally narrowband PA designs. Procedures for achieving the best trade-offs for performance will be address including how to design for high peak to average ratio modulated signals, efficiency, linearity and power. Design of continuous mode PAs with be demonstrated along with best practices for mixed signal (Analog/Digital) power modules.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WFJ-1: Introduction to Network Synthesis for Power Amplifiers
Gayle Collins, Obsidian Microwave
Abstract
WFJ-2: Impedances Needed by High-Efficiency Power Amplifiers
Frederick Raab, Green Mountain Radio Research
Abstract
WFJ-3: Real Frequency Technique for Broadband Power Amplifier Design
Binboga Siddik Yarman, Istanbul University
Abstract
WFJ-4: Designing Matching Networks with the Real Frequency Technique
Pieter Abrie, Ampsa (Pty) Ltd.
Abstract
WFJ-5: Network Synthesis, Transforms and Practical Issues for Broadband High Efficiency Power Amplifiers
Ramon Beltran, Qualcomm Technologies
Abstract
WFJ-6: Continuous Modes for High Efficiency Design
Tim Canning, Infineon Technologies
Abstract
WFJ-7: Broadband Highly Efficient and Linear Power Amplifiers for Next-Generation RF Front-Ends
Dimitrios Peroulis, Purdue Univ., Kenle Chen, Univ. of Rhode Island
Abstract
WFJ-8: Synthesis of Advanced Doherty Amplifier Combiners
John Gajadharsing, Ampleon Netherlands B.V.
Abstract
WFJ-9: Quasi-load insensitive class-E for Doherty and Outphasing Transmitters
Leo de Vreede, Delft Univ. of Technology, Morteza Alavi, Delft Univ. of Technology
Rüdiger Quay, Frank Sullivan
Fraunhofer IAF, Raytheon Corp.
Location
102AB
Abstract

In-Al-Ga-N/GaN wide band gap heterojunction technology as an advancement in active devices has been in development for several years. AlGaN/GaN devices are currently improving systems for radars and jammers particularly and are improving the operation cost fo 4G base stations in mobile communications.
This workshop aims to summarize the recent technical advancements and compare the potential performance to the widely used AlGaN/GaN device structures. InAlN/GaN, AlN/GaN and other heterojunction structures offer several potential advantages over AlGaN/GaN. These include 1) a lattice matched structure with much reduced lattice stress, 2) higher reliability and robustness due to the improved lattice match, 3) much higher output current and current density and thus higher output power where the high breakdown condition is preserved, 4) potentially higher chemical and thermal stability due to the higher temperature the structures can withstand, 5) potentially improved control of surface instabilities, and 6) thinner barrier and gate shorter gate structures which will lead to higher power performance at higher frequencies into the millimeter range. Both device and resulting microwave and millimeter circuit advancements will be addressed. This workshop will bring together experts from around the world to discuss the state of the art of this technology.

Technical Papers
Abstract
WFK-1: Dynamic Range-enhanced Electronics and Materials (DREaM)
Young-Kai Chen, Darpa
Abstract
WFK-2: Epitaxial growth of InAlN and InAlGaN barriers for advanced RF devices
Hugues Marchand, IQE, England
Abstract
WFK-3: Development of epitaxial processes for GaN-on-Si for RF applications
Joff Derluyn, EpiGaN, Belgium
Abstract
WFK-4: AlN/GaN Heterostructures and ICs for high power density mm-Wave operation
Rüdiger Quay, Fraunhofer IAF
Abstract
WFK-5: InAl(Ga)N/GaN HEMTs on SiC Technology for Ka and Q band Applications
Stephane Piotrowicz, III-V Lab 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel - Palaiseau, France
Abstract
WFK-6: Advances in novel III-N transistor structutres: FinFETs and vertical devices
Tomas Palacios, MIT
Abstract
WFK-7: Next Generation GaN-based Materials and Devices for RF Applications
Tom Kazior, Raytheon
Abstract
WFK-8: Nitrides in Transition: Exploring Unconventional Epitaxial Semiconductors and Superconductors
Dave Meyer, Electronics Science and Technology Division Naval Research Lab
Abstract
WFK-9: Panel with all speakers

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Zhongxia Simon He, Antonella Bogoni, Jane Zhao
Chalmers Univ. of Technology, TeCIP-Institute of TEchnologies for Communication, Information and Perception- Scuola superiore Sant, Autoroad Technology Beijing
Abstract

Distributed Antenna System (DAS) concept has been well adopted in several industrial standards. This concept would most likely to be inherited by the future telecommunication and automobile radar infrastructures. For the telecommunication market, future 5G mobile system would embrace massive MIMO concept where we would show packaging in one of the key challenge of system realization. For automobile radar and sensor fusion, interconnection and packaging multiple sensor in the car to form DAS is also the key challenge of future autonomous driving cars. In this course we would study the basic of active optic enabled high frequency signal connectivity, namely, radio over fiber (RoF); furthermore we will demonstrate how this RoF concept can be used to form future 5G system and automobiles. Speakers from both industry and academia are invited to share their vision on the future telecommunication and automobile systems.