Three Minute Thesis (3MT) Competition

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Three Minute Thesis (3MT®)

What is 3MT®?

Now in its second year at IMS2018, the Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) Competition is designed for eligible students and young professionals, who indicated upon submission of a paper their desire to enter the competition and whose paper is accepted for either oral or interactive forum presentation.

The 3MT® contestants will make a presentation of three minutes or less, supported only by one static slide, in a language appropriate to a non-specialist audience.

3MT® Goals

The IMS2018 3MT® Competition is designed to stimulate interest in the wide range of applications of microwave technology. Such information would help renew public interest in microwaves as a transformative technology that is rewarding both to those who study it, and to those whose daily lives benefit from incorporation of scientific developments in consumer products.

What is 3MT®, Why is it Beneficial, How is it Judged, and How to Prepare

IMS2018 3MT® Competition Rules
 

Three Minute Thesis Briefing Session:

Monday, 11 June 2018
Location: TBA
Time: 09:00-10:30

We encourage all IMS2018 attendees to come to the Briefing Session.

Organizers:
John Bandler, IMS2018 3MT® Chair
Erin Kiley, IMS2018 3MT® Co-chair

Abstract: The Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) Competition organizers will host a special session designed to introduce the competition, allow participants to familiarize themselves with the venue and facilities, remind participants of the goals of the competition, and to highlight important considerations that good 3MT® presentations should take into account.

Speakers:
John Bandler, IMS2018 3MT® Chair
Erin Kiley, IMS2018 3MT® Co-Chair
M/C, TBA

Three Minute Thesis Competition:

Monday, 11 June 2018
Location: TBA
Time: 14:00-16:00

We encourage all IMS2018 attendees to come to the Competition.

Organizers:
John Bandler, IMS2018 3MT® Chair
Erin Kiley, IMS2018 3MT® Co-chair

Abstract: The Three Minute Thesis 3MT® competition, developed by The University of Queensland (UQ), Australia, in 2008, (see http://threeminutethesis.org/) “cultivates students’ academic, presentation, and research communication skills. The competition supports their capacity to effectively explain their research in three minutes, in a language appropriate to a non-specialist audience.” In three minutes or less, using only one static slide, and no other props, contestants deliver their presentation to a panel of non-specialist judges. These judges rank the contestants, based on how engaging, accessible, and compelling they made their presentation. A candidate who goes overtime is disqualified.